Freedom from H.Pylori with Esclam

What is H.pylori infection?

Helicobacter pylori (commonly known as called H. pylori) are a germ (bacterium). It can infect the lining of the stomach and duodenum (the first part of the intestine). In many people, infection does not cause any symptoms. In some people, it can hurt the stomach lining, leading to gastritis (inflammation) and ulcers. Most patients with gastritis or an ulcer have pain or burning in the upper abdomen (the area above the belly button). In some people, infection with H. pylori leads to stomach cancer.

How can I get H.Pylori infection?

H. pylori are commonly transmitted person-to-person by saliva. The bacteria can also be spread by fecal contamination of food or water. In developing countries, a combination of untreated water, crowded conditions, and poor hygiene contributes to higher H. pylori prevalence. Most people become infected as children, and parents and siblings seem to play a primary role in transmission.

How does H.pylori causes stomach pain and hyperacidity?

H. pylori enter the body through the mouth, move through the digestive system, and infect the stomach or the first part of the small intestine. The spiral-shaped bacterium uses its tail-like flagella to move around and burrow into the stomach lining, which causes inflammation.
Unlike other bacteria, H. pylori bacteria can survive in the harsh acidic environment of the stomach because they produce a substance that neutralizes stomach acid. This substance, urease, reacts with urea to form ammonia, which is toxic to human cells. Depending on where the infection occurs in the stomach, H. pylori can also cause overproduction of stomach acid.

How is H. pylori infection diagnosed?

A blood test is an easy way to find out if you have an H. pylori infection. You might also get a breath test or a stool test for H. pylori. These tests are also used after treatment to find out if the infection is all gone.

Why should I be treated for H. pylori infection?

If the H. pylori germs are killed, your stomach ulcer or gastritis can be cured. Many people take antacids or other medicines for a long time before they get treated for H. pylori infection. After being treated for this infection, they don’t need to take as much medicine for their stomach. If it’s not treated it can cause complications such as stomach cancer

How is H. pylori infection treated?

H. pylori are killed by certain antibiotics. However, a combination of medicines is needed to get rid of it completely. This is referred to as combination therapy although because it gets rid of (eradicates) the germ it is also referred to as eradication therapy. Treatment includes a combination of antibiotics and acid-reducing medicines. You should take these medicines for 14 days and then continue to take acid reducing drugs (proton pump inhibitors, PPI) for 4-8 weeks to facilitate mucosal healing that was damaged by the acid. The most effective combinations include at least two antibiotics plus the acid reducers. For example the first line kit recommended in the treatment of H Pylori is Esclam kit which has Clarithromycin, Amoxicillin and esomeprazole.The acid-reducing medicines help relieve pain and help the antibiotics work better.

What can I do to help the treatment work?

What can I do to help the treatment work?
1. Take all of the prescribed medicine. Your treatment might not work for you if:
a) The bacteria resist the antibiotics
b) You don’t take all of the medicine.
It is very important to take your medicines for the full 14 days and then take the (esomac-brand name for esomeprazole) PPI, for the next 4-8 weeks as prescribed by your doctor. The first try at getting rid of H. pylori infection is usually the most successful, so it is important to do it right.
2. Avoid things that can increase stomach acid. Increased stomach acid can keep your medicines from working right. You should not take medicines that increase stomach acid, like aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen .Stay away from cigarettes, alcohol, caffeine, spicy foods, and coffee or tea (regular or decaffeinated).
3. Follow up with your doctor. See your doctor after you finish your medicines. You may get a breath test or the stool test to make sure the infection is gone.

Are there any side-effects after taking the kit?

Up to 3 in 10 people develop some side-effects when they take the H.Pylori kit. These include indigestion (dyspepsia), feeling sick (nausea), diarrhea and headaches. However, it is worth persevering with the full course if side-effects are not too bad. A switch to a different set of medicines may be advised if the first combination does not clear the H. pylori, or if it caused bad side-effects and you had to stop taking it. For instance if you are allergic to penicillins, you should avoid taking kits that contain amoxicillin.

How do I prevent myself from getting H.Pylori?

There is no vaccine for H. pylori. Since H. pylori might spread through unclean food and water, you might be able to prevent it if you:

  • Wash your hands after using the bathroom and before eating
  • Eat properly prepared food
  • Drink water from a clean, safe source

References

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